Evita Exaggerates Eva Peron’s Relationship with Magaldi

Based in San Diego, California, Terry Chucas is an attorney who represents parents and children on appeal in dependency court appeals. In his free time, Terry Chucas enjoys reading and sports. His favorite musical is Evita.

Andrew Lloyd Webber’s celebrated musical Evita is based on the true story of Eva Perón. One element that the play exaggerates is the relationship between Eva and Agustín Magaldi, who is portrayed as a traveling singer of mediocre talent best known for discovering Eva. In reality, he was a highly regarded tango singer.

In the play, he is presented as the reason Evita goes to Buenos Aires in the first play. However, there is no proof that he was in the city during those times. Many historians believe Eva made up a relationship with Magaldi, even carrying around a fabricated letter of introduction from him, to bolster her career. The play also depicts Magaldi alive in 1944, even though he died in 1938.

Relative Rights in California Dependency Court

For more than three decades, attorney Terry Chucas has handled dependency appeals in San Diego and Los Angeles Counties. In this role, Terry Chucas represents children and their parents in cases involving child removal and reunification. Under California law, parents can elect for removed children to be placed under the care of relatives.

During a dependency case, extended family members and, in some cases, close friends can take on caregiver rights. California recognizes relatives with a close blood relation, including siblings, grandparents, and step-family members. The court must also notify close family members of a child’s removal within 30 days.

While the court is obligated to prioritize the placement of a removed child with related caregivers, this process can only occur if a willing individual comes forward before the first court hearing. Grandparents may be granted visitation rights, even if the child is not placed in their care. The court also generally recognizes the right of a child to maintain contact with their siblings.

An Overview of the Dependency Appeal Process

A San Diego lawyer with more than two decades of experience, Terry Chucas has represented clients in complex and high-conflict divorce cases in the Superior Court of San Diego. Terry Chucas holds an AV rating from Martindale Hubbell and currently works on appeals cases in dependency court.

Dependency court cases involve a situation where a child has been removed from a home due to abuse, neglect, or abandonment. Once the judge has made the dependency decision, an appellate court will hear any appeals. The appeals process entails a thorough review of all records from the trial court proceedings, which includes attorney-written briefs, hearings, and papers filed with the court.

The purpose of the review is to verify that no legal errors were made and that the court correctly understood the law. Because an appeal is not a new trial, an appellate court will generally not accept new evidence or allow new witnesses to testify. Once it has fully reviewed the case, the appellate court can affirm the trial court’s judgment, modify the judgment, or review the judgment either fully or in part. If the judgment is reversed, it returns to the trial court for retrial.

How a Case Proceeds to Dependency Court

An attorney working in San Diego, Terry Chucas represents parents and children in dependency court appeals. Terry Chucas has been working as an attorney for over three decades and has handled thousands of cases with hundreds of trial appearances.

Typically, abuse and neglect cases that end up in the dependency court start with a reported concern. Reports that a child is being neglected or abused are investigated by a social worker, who interviews the child and other people involved in the report. The social worker can choose one of several courses of action.

If no evidence of abuse is found, the social worker can decide to take no action. If necessary, the social worker connects the parents with free services to help them raise their children more effectively and safely.

Alternately, the social worker may choose to leave the child in the care of the parents and file a petition with the court. The court then opens a case to protect the child.

In extreme cases, the social worker decides to remove the child from the parents’ care immediately. The social worker places the child with another relative or in a foster home and files a petition with the court to open a case to protect the child.

Types of Hearings in Dependency Court

Terry Chucas of San Diego possesses decades of experience as a family attorney. Selected for the Dependency Appellate Panel for the Fourth District Court of Appeal (San Diego), Terry Chucas represents parents and children in dependency court appeals.

In dependency court proceedings, there are three common types of hearings. Detention court hearings happen when children are removed from their parents. At the hearing, the judge decides if it is safe for the children to go back into the care of their parents until the next hearing.

In a jurisdictional hearing, the judge hears the allegations against a parent whose child has been removed. If the judge determines that the child is unsafe with his or her parents, the child will become a dependent of the court.

In a dispositional hearing, a judge determines what, if anything, a parent needs to do to improve conditions for his or her child. Dispositional hearings are sometimes a part of the jurisdictional hearing.

The True Story of Evita

Four Most Popular Wines

Based in San Diego, Terry Chucas is an attorney who represents parents and children in dependency court appeals. In his free time, Terry Chucas enjoys reading, traveling, and drinking wine.

There are many types of wines, which can be intimidating to the unacquainted. Here is a primer on four of the most popular wines.

1. Pinot Grigio – Dry and easy to drink, this is often light and fruity wine with a 10 to 12.5% ABV. Italian, Austrian, and German versions are usually produced in stainless-steel tanks and pair well with fish, chicken, and shellfish.

2. Chardonnay – Made from the most planted grape in the world, chardonnay wine can be produced in two different ways. Chardonnays are aged in oak tend to taste more buttery while chardonnays produced in stainless steel are crisper and cleaner. For the oaky chardonnays, look to Northern Burgundy, California, and South America.

3. Pinot Noir – Fruitier and softer than other red wines, Pinot Noir is a crowd favorite. The flavors can range from spicy horseradish to a more earthy mushroom.

4. Cabernet Sauvignon – Found in nearly every wine-growing region in the world, especially Napa and Bordeaux, this is the most popular red wine and pairs well with red meat. For a lighter taste, try a Meritage, which blends two or more Bordeaux grapes.

YMCA of San Diego’s Camp Surf

The recipient of a juris doctor degree from the Thomas Jefferson School of Law in San Diego, California, Terry Chucas leverages 30 years of experience as an attorney to represent parents and children in Dependency Court appeals. In addition to his pursuits in the legal sector, Terry Chucas is a supporter of the YMCA of San Diego.

A healthy living and youth development organization, the YMCA of San Diego operates several youth programs and camps, one of which is Camp Surf. Based on 45 acres of land near the Pacific Ocean, the one-of-a-kind camp offers more than just surfing opportunities and instruction. It also has a 30-foot climbing tower, archery field, Ga-Ga court, and low ropes course. Camp attendees can also design mini surfboard necklaces, trucker hats, and masks in arts and craft courses.

The campground has 13 cabins, each with 16 beds, as well as two 12-bed platform tents and four 12-bed “cabnets.” There’s also a solar-powered village that houses a gazebo, private campfire area, and 72 beds in “cabnets” and platform tents. The beach is also a suitable camping area that can accommodate as many as 300 guests.

There are four villages split into different age groups: Mariners (Grade 3-6), Watermen (Grade 7-8), Beachcombers (Grade 9-11), S.O.U.L Surfers (Grade 10-11). Moreover, students entering Grade 12 can apply to work as camp assistants.

Three Tips to Help You Read More

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Terry Chucas works as an attorney in San Diego, California, where he represents parents and their children in dependency court appeals. When away from work, Terry Chucas is an avid reader.

Reading is something many people enjoy, but sometimes it can be hard to find the time to read. If you have ever found yourself thinking you should read more but never do, these three tips will help you reach that goal.

1. Read what you love. Stick to topics and genres you are interested in so that you actually enjoy reading regularly. Once reading regularly becomes a normal part of your life, then you can think about branching out into new territory.

2. Give up on bad books. If you pick up a book and it doesn’t engage you, move on. There is no need to force yourself to finish a book you are not enjoying. Instead of viewing this as a failure to see things through, look at it as another chance to find a book you do like.

3. Keep your book with you. This can be especially helpful if you have trouble finding the time to read. With your book always at hand, every moment of downtime is an opportunity to get some reading done. When you have a few moments free at work, pull out your book. While you wait for an appointment, read.

Understanding the Icing Call in Hockey

Terry Chucas

Terry Chucas, a California-based attorney with nearly 30 years of experience, represents San Diego area parents and children in dependency court appeals. Beyond his work as an attorney, Terry Chucas enjoys watching hockey, including games at international tournaments.

In the sport of ice hockey, “icing” is a commonly seen infraction. Despite the frequency with which icing calls are made at the professional and collegiate levels, newcomers to the sport may not fully understand the penalty.

Similar to hockey’s offside rule, icing was developed to preserve the flow, quality, and integrity of the game. Without the icing penalty, players would be able to fling the puck to the opposite end of the floor and give chase as the puck slides, or flies, toward the opposing goal.

To prevent this, the icing rule dictates that no player can pass the puck from behind the center red line across the opposing side’s goal line. If the puck follows this trajectory and is not touched by any player, icing should be called.

A notable loophole is that if the puck travels beyond the goal line for a score, the goal is counted, and icing is not called. Similarly, teams playing down a man cannot be called for icing.